Biography

Peter Selgin is the author of Drowning Lessons, winner of the Flannery O’Connor Award for Fiction; a novel; two books on fiction writing; and several children’s books. Confessions of a Left-Handed Man, his memoir-in-essays, was short-listed for the William Saroyan International Prize. His novel,The Water Master, won the Wisdom/Faulkner Society Prize for Best Novel. His essays have won many awards and honors, including six citations and two selections for the Best American anthologies, in which the title essay of his collection appears.

Selgin’s drama A God in the House, based on Dr. Kevorkian and his suicide machine, was staged at the Eugene O’Neill National Playwrights’ Conference in 1991. Other plays of his have won the Charlotte Repertory New Play Festival Competition, the Mill Mountain New Plays Competition, and the Stage 3 Theater Festival of New Plays. His paintings have been featured in The New Yorker, Gourmet, Outside, Forbes, and The Wall Street Journal, and exhibited nationally.

Selgin is the prose editor of Alimentum: The Literature of Food, and nonfiction editor and art director of Arts & Letters. He is Assistant Professor of English at Georgia College and an associate faculty member of Antioch University’s Creative Writing MFA program in Los Angeles.

Titles

The Inventors

  • Introduction by Lidia Yuknavitch
  • nonfiction / memoir

Peter Selgin is a born writer, capable of taking any subject and exploring it from a new angle, with wit, grace, and erudition.

Oliver Sacks

In the Fall of 1970, at the start of eighth grade, Peter Selgin fell in love with the young teacher who’d arrived from Oxford wearing Frye boots, with long blond hair, and a passion for his students that was as intense as it was rebellious. The son of an emotionally remote inventor, Peter was...Forward

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News

On the Hawthorne Books Blog

my father and mr. aiken

Posted by Peter Selgin on 11 April 2016

During that first year at Harvard, my father met a man who, had circumstances been ever-so-slightly different, would have altered the course of his professional life. That someone was an older...Forward

Elsewhere